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tdro

Another wandering soul whispering into the void. If you are looking for my blog you are in the wrong place. The profile and header pictures are brought to you by cdd20.

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I saw something peculiar the other day. Hallucination? The microsoft.com domain was serving up 192.168.1.0 and 192.168.1.1 as A records in a 7 address round robin.

That’s a spooky reminder to check your rebinding setup — that is, if you’re playing with fire ().

For example, unbound with private-address and private-domain. Then test if DNS rebinding is possible.

#linux
tdro

Another wandering soul whispering into the void. If you are looking for my blog you are in the wrong place. The profile and header pictures are brought to you by cdd20.

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Are the caches warmed up? vmtouch and fincore are two useful programs.

What do they do? Basically, one can peek at what’s been cached into memory. I somehow ended up re–looking into this today. The Linux kernel is intelligent.

#linux
tdro

Another wandering soul whispering into the void. If you are looking for my blog you are in the wrong place. The profile and header pictures are brought to you by cdd20.

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Many fortnights ago, I foolishly thought writing a theme from scratch would be easy. It was mostly unlike GTK2. About 40 minutes in came a horrifying realization: there’s fundamentally (and definitively) no way to write a consistent theme that works reliably with every application. The minor upside was a working (and somewhat accessible) wireframe theme and a basic understanding of debugging. The end.

shell
GTK_DEBUG=interactive firefox
#linux
tdro

Another wandering soul whispering into the void. If you are looking for my blog you are in the wrong place. The profile and header pictures are brought to you by cdd20.

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An actual but where did my Linux memory go command;
This program (repositories) came in handy while helping someone resolve an problem. Want to see memory usage and shared memory, perhaps sorted by swap?

shell
smem -s swap -kta
smem --sort swap --abbreviate --totals --autosize
What about on other categories running a --sort?
text
swap     (amount of swap space consumed ignoring sharing)
command  (process command line)
maps     (total mappings count)
name     (process name)
pid      (process id #)
user     (process owner)
pss      (proportional set size including sharing)
rss      (resident set size ignoring sharing)
uss      (unique set size)
vss      (virtual set size; total virtual memory mapped)
Bonus: A filesystem usage command to catch /tmp/ and tmpfs (temporary file storage) abusers;
shell
df -h | grep tmpfs
df --human-readable | grep tmpfs
#gists #linux

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